Parlando: The COC Blog

10/21/2013

The lovers of La Bohème

The lovers (Mimì/Rodolfo & Musetta/Marcello) in the COC’s La Bohème share their thoughts on their roles, the music, and the beauty of Puccini’s most popular opera.

Phillip Addis –Marcello/Schaunard

The music of La Bohème completes and enhances a simple but beautifully sad story. The text isn’t complicated, keeping with the distilled nature of the characters, but Puccini’s rich score gives fullness to the drama, suggesting everything that is left unsaid and simply felt from the heart.

Eric Margiore – Rodolfo

As an actor, it is a tremendous joy to bring Rodolfo to life through the interactions with his best friends and with his love, Mimì. My favourite moment of La Bohème is when we first see Rodolfo and Mimì falling in love. In the music we hear all the modes of a new love, from the nervous fumbling through the ardent palpitations and declarations. There is a moment in the duet, “O soave fanciulla,”when both voices come together in a truly climactic explosion of passion that everyone in the theatre will experience!

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Posted by Danielle D'Ornellas / in La Bohème / comments (0) / permalink

10/18/2013

John Caird directs a new Bohème

by Suzanne Vanstone

Whether you are an opera neophyte or a seasoned aficionado, chances are you have experienced La Bohème’s beautiful music and heart-wrenching tale in some fashion – be it with a full production, excerpted highlights, or perhaps that aria on the radio that you can’t quite name, but know intimately. A repertoire staple since the company’s inaugural season in 1950, the COC is thrilled to bring a brand new Bohème to its stage under the direction of Tony-award winning director John Caird.

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Posted by Danielle D'Ornellas / in La Bohème / comments (0) / permalink

10/16/2013

Heppner on Peter Grimes

by Suzanne Vanstone

Following his deserved ovations in the COC’s Tristan und Isolde last season, celebrated tenor Ben Heppner returns to portray one of the most iconic roles in 20th-century opera – Peter Grimes. Benjamin Britten’s masterful composition of a tormented fisherman shunned by an unforgiving society is a favourite of Heppner’s, and he’s performed the role worldwide in over 40 performances in seven productions. In fact, as soon as the curtain comes down in Toronto in October, he is off to do it again in Vienna.

The role is a complex one to perform, balancing Grimes’s often raging persona with a softer, wounded man who, because of the death of his young apprentice, is forced to defend himself against those who have already decided his guilt. Heppner says, “If you try to soften him too much, he can appear whiny. You have to have the confidence to be disliked. Grimes is not a likeable character in many ways. From the beginning he comes across as being self-righteous, railing, ‘No. I want to explain myself in court. Don’t leave me to be judged by the court of public opinion,’ yet the whole time he is judged by the court of public opinion.”

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Posted by Danielle D'Ornellas / in Peter Grimes / comments (0) / permalink

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Sara Fulgoni in the COC production of Bluebeard's Castle. Photo: Michael Cooper © 2001