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EUGENE ONEGIN

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
To

“★★★★” (out of 4) “From the staging to the singing to the orchestra, everything was solid gold.” - Toronto Star

Tatyana’s quiet existence is turned upside down with the arrival of the handsome and charismatic Onegin. Romantic fantasies burst into vivid reality, inspiring Tatyana’s famous letter, which Onegin arrogantly rejects. Years later, separated by time and circumstance, they are reunited for one final, explosive encounter.

Acclaimed for its beauty and elegant simplicity, this production, originally created for the Metropolitan Opera, is directed by Robert Carsen and designed by Michael Levine, two Canadian visionaries of the opera stage.



Connect with us on social by using #COCOnegin | @CanadianOpera

UNDER 30? Get your $22 tickets here.


Details

On stage at the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W., Toronto.

Performance time is approximately two hours and 50 minutes, including one intermission.



Sung in Russian with English SURTITLESTM


Cast and CREATIVE TEAMS
Eugene Onegin Gordon Bintner
Tatyana Joyce El-Khoury
Olga Varduhi Abrahamyan
Lensky Joseph Kaiser
Prince Gremin Oleg Tsibulko
Madame Larina Helene Schneiderman
Triquet Christophe Mortagne
Filipyevna Margaret Lattimore

Conductor Johannes Debus
Original Director Robert Carsen
Associate Director Peter McClintock
Set & Costume Designer Michael Levine
Original Lighting Designer Jean Kalman
Revival Lighting Designer Christine Binder
Choreographer Serge Bennathan
Asst. Set & Costume Designer Victoria Wallace
Price Family Chorus Master* Sandra Horst

*Sandra Horst and the COC Chorus are generously underwritten by Tim & Frances Price

With the COC Orchestra and Chorus

Production premiered by the Metropolitan Opera in New York City on March 13, 1997. All scenery, properties and costumes constructed by the Metropolitan Opera Shops.

Synopsis

SYNOPSIS IN A MINUTE

In a deeply emotional letter, the young Tatyana declares her love to the proud Onegin, who rejects her. After killing his friend Lensky in a duel, Onegin travels the world to try and escape his regret. When he meets Tatyana years later, he realizes he loves her, but it is too late. Tatyana is now married and even though she still loves Onegin, it is her turn to reject him.

FULL SYNOPSIS

ACT I

Scene i

At the Larin country estate, the widowed Madame Larina lives quietly with her two daughters, the vivacious Olga and the dreamy and reserved Tatyana. Lensky, a poet and Olga’s suitor, comes to visit and brings his new neighbor Onegin to meet the family. Tatyana is instantly struck by Onegin, believing him to be the one she has been waiting for.

Scene ii

Tatyana cannot sleep and asks her old nurse Filipyevna to tell her about her own youth and marriage. After dismissing Filpyevna, Tatyana pours out her overwhelming feelings in a letter for Onegin. As dawn breaks, she gives the letter to Filpyevna to have delivered.

Scene iii

The women of the estate are picking fruit and singing. They move along and Tatyana enters, remorseful about her letter. Onegin enters. He tells her that while her candour has touched him, he is not meant for marriage—a union between them would only bring mutual unhappiness and misery. His love for her is like a brother, and he warns her to control her feelings in the future, as not all men might be so understanding.

ACT II

Scene i

A ball is underway at the Larin estate to celebrate Tatyana’s name day. Neighbours gossip about Tatyana and Onegin; angered by this, and resenting Lensky for insisting that he attend, Onegin monopolizes Olga’s attention, which angers Lensky. Monsieur Triquet, the French master at a neighbour’s house, sings some verses that he has composed in honour of Tatyana. Lensky accuses Onegin of flirting with Olga and of being a disloyal friend. The argument escalates and Lensky challenges Onegin to a duel.

INTERMISSION

Scene ii

It is barely dawn and Lensky and Zaretsky, his second, await Onegin at the site of the duel. Lensky sings of his lost innocence, his love for Olga, and his impending death. Onegin arrives with Monsieur Guillot, his second. As the men prepare to fight, they sing regretfully of their lost friendship. However the duel proceeds and Lensky falls, dead. Onegin is devastated.

ACT III

Scene i

It is several years later and Onegin has been trying to escape his unhappiness with travel. Now he has returned to St. Petersburg and is attending a ball. Prince Gremin enters with Tatyana on his arm. Onegin asks the prince, a relation, who she is. The prince tells him that she is his wife—in old age he has found love. Prince Gremin presents Tatyana to Onegin. Onegin is stunned to recognize the same girl he scorned in the past is now a beautiful and cultured woman. Tatyana manages to hide her intense emotion at this reunion and complains of tiredness; she and her husband leave the ball.

Scene ii

Onegin has written to Tatyana declaring his love. He arrives at her home and begs forgiveness from her. She reminds him of his treatment of her in the past and how happy they might have been. She begs him to leave; he refuses, passionately declaring his love for her. Tatyana admits to Onegin that she still loves him, but duty bids her to remain with her husband. She bids him farewell and leaves. Onegin is left alone, in despair.

GALLERY
 
 
 


Production photos from Canadian Opera Company's production of 
Eugene Onegin, 2018. Photos 1, 2, 4: Michael Cooper; Photo 3: Gary Beechey. 

READ

Director's Notes: Eugene Onegin's Robert Carsen

“Tchaikovsky’s opera Eugene Onegin, based on Pushkin’s verse novel of the same title, has come to represent Russian character and emotion at its most intense. When Michael Levine and I developed on our production for the Metropolitan Opera, we sought to find a poetic response to this most intensely subjective and emotive of operas.

READ MORE

WATCH

Prince Gremin's Aria, Oleg Tsibulko | October 2018

An excerpt from Prince Gremin's aria, featuring bass Oleg Tsibulko.







Letter Scene Excerpt | October 2018


Watch Joyce El-Khoury perform an excerpt from Tatyana's Letter Aria ("Puskai pogibnu ya") from Act I.







Act I Excerpt | October 2018


Here is an excerpt from Act I featuring Gordon Bintner (Onegin), Joyce El-Khoury (Tatyana), Joseph Kaiser (Lensky), and Varduhi Abrahamyan (Olga).







Act III Excerpt | October 2018


An excerpt from Act III featuring Gordon Bintner (Onegin) and Joyce El-Khoury (Tatyana).





LISTEN
Opera in 10 Podcast: Eugene Onegin
Ensemble Studio pianist & coach Stéphane Mayer gives you the rundown on what to listen for in Tchaikovsky's masterpiece, Eugene Onegin, including moving moments, impossibly catchy hooks, and all the great dance numbers.





MUSICAL HIGHLIGHTS


Act I, scene ii
Letter Scene: "Puskai pogibnu ya" ("Let me perish")


Tatyana remains awake all night composing a letter to Onegin in which she pours out her love for him.


Act II, scene ii
Aria: “Kuda, kuda” (“Where, oh where”)

About to duel with Onegin, Lensky grieves for his lost youth, for the knowledge that one of them will die, and reminisces about his great love for Olga.


Act III, scene i
Polonaise


At a ball in St. Petersburg, a polonaise is played.



Music credit: Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin. Nuccia Focile (Tatyana), Neil Shicoff (Lensky), and Semyon Bychkov, conductor, with the Orchestra de Paris, 1993. Philips
BUZZ

” (out of 4)
“From the staging to the singing to the orchestra, everything was solid gold.” Toronto Star

“NNNN”
“Stunning” NOW Magazine

“Opera does not get more romantic than this.” New York Magazine

“A powerful psychological treatment that packs an emotional wallop.” Ludwig Van Toronto

“Michael Levine's period costumes are absolutely beautiful.” New York Times

“A triumph of Canadian talent on all sides.” barczablog

  • On stage at the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W., Toronto.

    Performance time is approximately two hours and 50 minutes, including one intermission.



    Sung in Russian with English SURTITLESTM


    Cast and CREATIVE TEAMS
    Eugene Onegin Gordon Bintner
    Tatyana Joyce El-Khoury
    Olga Varduhi Abrahamyan
    Lensky Joseph Kaiser
    Prince Gremin Oleg Tsibulko
    Madame Larina Helene Schneiderman
    Triquet Christophe Mortagne
    Filipyevna Margaret Lattimore

    Conductor Johannes Debus
    Original Director Robert Carsen
    Associate Director Peter McClintock
    Set & Costume Designer Michael Levine
    Original Lighting Designer Jean Kalman
    Revival Lighting Designer Christine Binder
    Choreographer Serge Bennathan
    Asst. Set & Costume Designer Victoria Wallace
    Price Family Chorus Master* Sandra Horst

    *Sandra Horst and the COC Chorus are generously underwritten by Tim & Frances Price

    With the COC Orchestra and Chorus

    Production premiered by the Metropolitan Opera in New York City on March 13, 1997. All scenery, properties and costumes constructed by the Metropolitan Opera Shops.

  • SYNOPSIS IN A MINUTE

    In a deeply emotional letter, the young Tatyana declares her love to the proud Onegin, who rejects her. After killing his friend Lensky in a duel, Onegin travels the world to try and escape his regret. When he meets Tatyana years later, he realizes he loves her, but it is too late. Tatyana is now married and even though she still loves Onegin, it is her turn to reject him.

    FULL SYNOPSIS

    ACT I

    Scene i

    At the Larin country estate, the widowed Madame Larina lives quietly with her two daughters, the vivacious Olga and the dreamy and reserved Tatyana. Lensky, a poet and Olga’s suitor, comes to visit and brings his new neighbor Onegin to meet the family. Tatyana is instantly struck by Onegin, believing him to be the one she has been waiting for.

    Scene ii

    Tatyana cannot sleep and asks her old nurse Filipyevna to tell her about her own youth and marriage. After dismissing Filpyevna, Tatyana pours out her overwhelming feelings in a letter for Onegin. As dawn breaks, she gives the letter to Filpyevna to have delivered.

    Scene iii

    The women of the estate are picking fruit and singing. They move along and Tatyana enters, remorseful about her letter. Onegin enters. He tells her that while her candour has touched him, he is not meant for marriage—a union between them would only bring mutual unhappiness and misery. His love for her is like a brother, and he warns her to control her feelings in the future, as not all men might be so understanding.

    ACT II

    Scene i

    A ball is underway at the Larin estate to celebrate Tatyana’s name day. Neighbours gossip about Tatyana and Onegin; angered by this, and resenting Lensky for insisting that he attend, Onegin monopolizes Olga’s attention, which angers Lensky. Monsieur Triquet, the French master at a neighbour’s house, sings some verses that he has composed in honour of Tatyana. Lensky accuses Onegin of flirting with Olga and of being a disloyal friend. The argument escalates and Lensky challenges Onegin to a duel.

    INTERMISSION

    Scene ii

    It is barely dawn and Lensky and Zaretsky, his second, await Onegin at the site of the duel. Lensky sings of his lost innocence, his love for Olga, and his impending death. Onegin arrives with Monsieur Guillot, his second. As the men prepare to fight, they sing regretfully of their lost friendship. However the duel proceeds and Lensky falls, dead. Onegin is devastated.

    ACT III

    Scene i

    It is several years later and Onegin has been trying to escape his unhappiness with travel. Now he has returned to St. Petersburg and is attending a ball. Prince Gremin enters with Tatyana on his arm. Onegin asks the prince, a relation, who she is. The prince tells him that she is his wife—in old age he has found love. Prince Gremin presents Tatyana to Onegin. Onegin is stunned to recognize the same girl he scorned in the past is now a beautiful and cultured woman. Tatyana manages to hide her intense emotion at this reunion and complains of tiredness; she and her husband leave the ball.

    Scene ii

    Onegin has written to Tatyana declaring his love. He arrives at her home and begs forgiveness from her. She reminds him of his treatment of her in the past and how happy they might have been. She begs him to leave; he refuses, passionately declaring his love for her. Tatyana admits to Onegin that she still loves him, but duty bids her to remain with her husband. She bids him farewell and leaves. Onegin is left alone, in despair.

  •  
     
     


    Production photos from Canadian Opera Company's production of 
    Eugene Onegin, 2018. Photos 1, 2, 4: Michael Cooper; Photo 3: Gary Beechey. 

  • Director's Notes: Eugene Onegin's Robert Carsen

    “Tchaikovsky’s opera Eugene Onegin, based on Pushkin’s verse novel of the same title, has come to represent Russian character and emotion at its most intense. When Michael Levine and I developed on our production for the Metropolitan Opera, we sought to find a poetic response to this most intensely subjective and emotive of operas.

    READ MORE

  • Prince Gremin's Aria, Oleg Tsibulko | October 2018

    An excerpt from Prince Gremin's aria, featuring bass Oleg Tsibulko.







    Letter Scene Excerpt | October 2018


    Watch Joyce El-Khoury perform an excerpt from Tatyana's Letter Aria ("Puskai pogibnu ya") from Act I.







    Act I Excerpt | October 2018


    Here is an excerpt from Act I featuring Gordon Bintner (Onegin), Joyce El-Khoury (Tatyana), Joseph Kaiser (Lensky), and Varduhi Abrahamyan (Olga).







    Act III Excerpt | October 2018


    An excerpt from Act III featuring Gordon Bintner (Onegin) and Joyce El-Khoury (Tatyana).





  • Opera in 10 Podcast: Eugene Onegin
    Ensemble Studio pianist & coach Stéphane Mayer gives you the rundown on what to listen for in Tchaikovsky's masterpiece, Eugene Onegin, including moving moments, impossibly catchy hooks, and all the great dance numbers.





    MUSICAL HIGHLIGHTS


    Act I, scene ii
    Letter Scene: "Puskai pogibnu ya" ("Let me perish")


    Tatyana remains awake all night composing a letter to Onegin in which she pours out her love for him.


    Act II, scene ii
    Aria: “Kuda, kuda” (“Where, oh where”)

    About to duel with Onegin, Lensky grieves for his lost youth, for the knowledge that one of them will die, and reminisces about his great love for Olga.


    Act III, scene i
    Polonaise


    At a ball in St. Petersburg, a polonaise is played.



    Music credit: Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin. Nuccia Focile (Tatyana), Neil Shicoff (Lensky), and Semyon Bychkov, conductor, with the Orchestra de Paris, 1993. Philips
  • ” (out of 4)
    “From the staging to the singing to the orchestra, everything was solid gold.” Toronto Star

    “NNNN”
    “Stunning” NOW Magazine

    “Opera does not get more romantic than this.” New York Magazine

    “A powerful psychological treatment that packs an emotional wallop.” Ludwig Van Toronto

    “Michael Levine's period costumes are absolutely beautiful.” New York Times

    “A triumph of Canadian talent on all sides.” barczablog


Banner photo features Dorian Cox (Program Manager, Free Concert Series), by Gaetz Photography.

EUGENE ONEGIN

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
To

“★★★★” (out of 4) “From the staging to the singing to the orchestra, everything was solid gold.” - Toronto Star

Tatyana’s quiet existence is turned upside down with the arrival of the handsome and charismatic Onegin. Romantic fantasies burst into vivid reality, inspiring Tatyana’s famous letter, which Onegin arrogantly rejects. Years later, separated by time and circumstance, they are reunited for one final, explosive encounter.

Acclaimed for its beauty and elegant simplicity, this production, originally created for the Metropolitan Opera, is directed by Robert Carsen and designed by Michael Levine, two Canadian visionaries of the opera stage.



Connect with us on social by using #COCOnegin | @CanadianOpera

UNDER 30? Get your $22 tickets here.

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