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The Marriage of Figaro

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Dates are unavailable at the moment

JANUARY 27, 29, FEBRUARY 2, 4, 10, 12, 16, AND 18, 2023


Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

Performance time is approximately three hours and 30 minutes, including one 25-minute intermission


When Count Almaviva attempts to seduce Susanna on the eve of her wedding, Figaro and Susanna join forces with the spurned Countess to deliver an unforgettable lesson in love.

Mozart serves up the most luminous and profound music for this subversive story of servants who topple their masters and women who prove wiser than the men around them. Claus Guth’s acclaimed production features the return of COC Ensemble Studio grad Gordon Bintner.


Credits
Sung in Italian with English SURTITLESTM



CAST AND CREATIVE TEAMS


Conductor: Harry Bicket
Director: Claus Guth
Set & Costume Designer: Christian Schmidt
Lighting Designer: Olaf Winter
Video Designer: Andi A. Müller
Choreographer: Ramses Sigl
Price Family Chorus Master: Sandra Horst

Figaro: Luca Pisaroni
Susanna: Louise Alder
Countess: Johanni Van Oostrum
Count: Gordon Bintner
Cherubino: Emily Fons
Dr. Bartolo: Robert Pomakov
Marcellina: Helene Schneiderman
Antonio: Doug MacNaughton
Cherubim: Uli Kirsch

With the COC Orchestra and Chorus

A Canadian Opera Company production

Production underwritten in part by Howard & Sarah D. Solomon Foundation in honour of Alexander Neef

Production originally built by the Salzburg Festival in celebration of the 250th anniversary of Mozart's birth

The Story

SYNOPSIS IN A MINUTE

Household servants, Figaro and Susanna, are getting married. But first, with the help of the Countess, they must deflect the Count’s attempt to seduce Susanna. Intrigue and mayhem ensue as the social structure of the household is turned upside down. 

 

FULL SYNOPSIS

 

ACT I 

Susanna informs her fiancé Figaro that the Count is making advances to her. Figaro leaves set on revenge. Bartolo and Marcellina enter, the latter baiting Susanna because she wants Figaro for herself, while Bartolo is still smarting at Figaro for making a fool of him in the past. They leave and Cherubino enters, seeking advice from Susanna because, after being caught dallying with the gardener’s niece, he is to be sent away. He hides himself as they hear the Count approaching. The Count, too, is forced to hide as Don Basilio enters. Basilio mentions Cherubino’s crush on the Countess to Susanna and the enraged Count reveals himself. He informs them that he is sending Cherubino away, at which point he finds the hidden page. Furious, he swears to get rid of Cherubino by giving him a military commission. Figaro returns with celebrating townsfolk and asks the Count to unite Susanna with him in marriage. The Count postpones the proceedings. 

 

ACT II 

Susanna tells the Countess that she and Figaro have a plan to teach the Count a lesson: Susanna will set up a rendezvous with the Count, but will send Cherubino in her place, disguised as a girl. The page enters with a song of love for the Countess and a commission letter that the Count forgot to seal. They hear the Count approaching and quickly hide Cherubino in an inner chamber and Susanna elsewhere in the room. The Count is instantly suspicious. The Countess refuses to unlock the inner chamber, claiming Susanna is inside trying on her wedding dress. The Count leaves with the Countess to get a crowbar. Susanna hides herself in the locked inner chamber and Cherubino escapes through the window. Upon their return, the Countess decides to confess everything to her husband and is shocked when Susanna exits the locked room. The Count begs forgiveness for his suspicions. Figaro arrives to gather up the group once more for the wedding. He is followed by Antonio, the gardener, who reports that someone jumping from the Countess’ balcony has crushed his flowers. After prompting from the women, Figaro claims it was he who jumped. Antonio shows him Cherubino’s dropped commission, which Figaro claims he was holding to get the Count’s seal. Marcellina, Bartolo and Basilio enter, and the Count, still suspicious, hears their claim that Figaro is obliged to marry Marcellina to pay off an outstanding debt.  

 

INTERMISSION 


ACTIII 

Susanna agrees to meet the Count in the garden. The Count then overhears Susanna tell Figaro that his legal troubles will soon be over. He is furious at the apparent deception. Marcellina and Bartolo, their attorney Don Curzio in tow, confront Figaro, who tells them that being of noble birth—though stolen away by thieves as an infant—he can only marry with the consent of his family. As proof, he reveals his birthmark. Marcellina and Bartolo recognize the mark as belonging to their son, and the three joyfully reunite. Susanna rejoins them, having secured the money from the Countess to pay off Figaro’s debt. At first angry, Susanna is overjoyed at the news. Everyone is happy except the Count, who is sure he’s still being played. The Countess dictates a letter from Susanna to the Count. She plans to surprise her husband in the garden herself. Figaro returns to once more gather everyone for the wedding. During the dancing, Susanna slips the Count her letter.  

 

ACT IV 

In the garden, Figaro meets the gardener’s daughter, Barbarina, who the Count has entrusted to return the brooch Susanna pinned to the letter. Figaro assumes Susanna is cheating on him, and invites Bartolo and Don Basilio to join him for her public humiliation. As they leave, the Countess and Susanna appear, each dressed as the other. Cherubino is also in the garden meeting with Barbarina. He spies the Countess and, thinking she is Susanna, leans in to kiss her. Instead he kisses the Count, who swats Figaro. The Count declares his love for Susanna, who is really the Countess, while Figaro tells the Countess, who is really Susanna, about the tryst. Susanna forgets to disguise her voice, and Figaro figures out it is she under the Countess’s cloak. Their embrace is noticed by the Count, who is about to expose them when his wife takes off her own disguise. Almaviva is shamed and apologizes to his wife for both his jealousy and his infidelity. They all return to the celebration. 

 

  • Sung in Italian with English SURTITLESTM


    CAST AND CREATIVE TEAMS


    Conductor: Harry Bicket
    Director: Claus Guth
    Set & Costume Designer: Christian Schmidt
    Lighting Designer: Olaf Winter
    Video Designer: Andi A. Müller
    Choreographer: Ramses Sigl
    Price Family Chorus Master: Sandra Horst

    Figaro: Luca Pisaroni
    Susanna: Louise Alder
    Countess: Johanni Van Oostrum
    Count: Gordon Bintner
    Cherubino: Emily Fons
    Dr. Bartolo: Robert Pomakov
    Marcellina: Helene Schneiderman
    Antonio: Doug MacNaughton
    Cherubim: Uli Kirsch

    With the COC Orchestra and Chorus

    A Canadian Opera Company production

    Production underwritten in part by Howard & Sarah D. Solomon Foundation in honour of Alexander Neef

    Production originally built by the Salzburg Festival in celebration of the 250th anniversary of Mozart's birth

  • SYNOPSIS IN A MINUTE

    Household servants, Figaro and Susanna, are getting married. But first, with the help of the Countess, they must deflect the Count’s attempt to seduce Susanna. Intrigue and mayhem ensue as the social structure of the household is turned upside down. 

     

    FULL SYNOPSIS

     

    ACT I 

    Susanna informs her fiancé Figaro that the Count is making advances to her. Figaro leaves set on revenge. Bartolo and Marcellina enter, the latter baiting Susanna because she wants Figaro for herself, while Bartolo is still smarting at Figaro for making a fool of him in the past. They leave and Cherubino enters, seeking advice from Susanna because, after being caught dallying with the gardener’s niece, he is to be sent away. He hides himself as they hear the Count approaching. The Count, too, is forced to hide as Don Basilio enters. Basilio mentions Cherubino’s crush on the Countess to Susanna and the enraged Count reveals himself. He informs them that he is sending Cherubino away, at which point he finds the hidden page. Furious, he swears to get rid of Cherubino by giving him a military commission. Figaro returns with celebrating townsfolk and asks the Count to unite Susanna with him in marriage. The Count postpones the proceedings. 

     

    ACT II 

    Susanna tells the Countess that she and Figaro have a plan to teach the Count a lesson: Susanna will set up a rendezvous with the Count, but will send Cherubino in her place, disguised as a girl. The page enters with a song of love for the Countess and a commission letter that the Count forgot to seal. They hear the Count approaching and quickly hide Cherubino in an inner chamber and Susanna elsewhere in the room. The Count is instantly suspicious. The Countess refuses to unlock the inner chamber, claiming Susanna is inside trying on her wedding dress. The Count leaves with the Countess to get a crowbar. Susanna hides herself in the locked inner chamber and Cherubino escapes through the window. Upon their return, the Countess decides to confess everything to her husband and is shocked when Susanna exits the locked room. The Count begs forgiveness for his suspicions. Figaro arrives to gather up the group once more for the wedding. He is followed by Antonio, the gardener, who reports that someone jumping from the Countess’ balcony has crushed his flowers. After prompting from the women, Figaro claims it was he who jumped. Antonio shows him Cherubino’s dropped commission, which Figaro claims he was holding to get the Count’s seal. Marcellina, Bartolo and Basilio enter, and the Count, still suspicious, hears their claim that Figaro is obliged to marry Marcellina to pay off an outstanding debt.  

     

    INTERMISSION 


    ACTIII 

    Susanna agrees to meet the Count in the garden. The Count then overhears Susanna tell Figaro that his legal troubles will soon be over. He is furious at the apparent deception. Marcellina and Bartolo, their attorney Don Curzio in tow, confront Figaro, who tells them that being of noble birth—though stolen away by thieves as an infant—he can only marry with the consent of his family. As proof, he reveals his birthmark. Marcellina and Bartolo recognize the mark as belonging to their son, and the three joyfully reunite. Susanna rejoins them, having secured the money from the Countess to pay off Figaro’s debt. At first angry, Susanna is overjoyed at the news. Everyone is happy except the Count, who is sure he’s still being played. The Countess dictates a letter from Susanna to the Count. She plans to surprise her husband in the garden herself. Figaro returns to once more gather everyone for the wedding. During the dancing, Susanna slips the Count her letter.  

     

    ACT IV 

    In the garden, Figaro meets the gardener’s daughter, Barbarina, who the Count has entrusted to return the brooch Susanna pinned to the letter. Figaro assumes Susanna is cheating on him, and invites Bartolo and Don Basilio to join him for her public humiliation. As they leave, the Countess and Susanna appear, each dressed as the other. Cherubino is also in the garden meeting with Barbarina. He spies the Countess and, thinking she is Susanna, leans in to kiss her. Instead he kisses the Count, who swats Figaro. The Count declares his love for Susanna, who is really the Countess, while Figaro tells the Countess, who is really Susanna, about the tryst. Susanna forgets to disguise her voice, and Figaro figures out it is she under the Countess’s cloak. Their embrace is noticed by the Count, who is about to expose them when his wife takes off her own disguise. Almaviva is shamed and apologizes to his wife for both his jealousy and his infidelity. They all return to the celebration. 

     


2022 season creative: BT/A

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts capacity: 2,070
Ticket prices do not include service fees, $9 CAD

The Marriage of Figaro

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
To

JANUARY 27, 29, FEBRUARY 2, 4, 10, 12, 16, AND 18, 2023


Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts

Performance time is approximately three hours and 30 minutes, including one 25-minute intermission


When Count Almaviva attempts to seduce Susanna on the eve of her wedding, Figaro and Susanna join forces with the spurned Countess to deliver an unforgettable lesson in love.

Mozart serves up the most luminous and profound music for this subversive story of servants who topple their masters and women who prove wiser than the men around them. Claus Guth’s acclaimed production features the return of COC Ensemble Studio grad Gordon Bintner.

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